Overview

This page is designed to guide instruction on the Bill of Rights and the Red Bulls in connection with the Freedom Walk of America™. Over a variety of lessons, participants will obtain a deep understanding of the rights our founding fathers passionately fought. Each lesson has suggested activities for varying grade levels from primary through adult learners.

Vocabulary

  • Red Bull Infantry (Lesson 1)
  • Bill of Rights (Lesson 2)
  • Constitution (Lesson 2)
  • Congress (Lesson 2)
  • Free excise (Lesson 3)
  • Abridging (Lesson 3)
  • Petition (Lesson 3)
  • Right to bear arms (Lesson 4)
  • Quarter (Lesson 5)
  • Search and seizure (Lesson 6)
  • Warrant (Lesson 6)
  • Pleading the fifth (Lesson 7)
  • Double jeopardy (Lesson 7)
  • Due process (Lesson 7)
  • Right to legal counsel (Lesson 8)
  • Civil case (Lesson 9)
  • Trial by jury (Lesson 9)
  • Bail (Lesson 10)
  • Cruel and Unusual Punishment (Lesson 10)
  • Unenumerated rights (Lesson 11)
  • Enumeration (Lesson 11)
  • Implied powers (Lesson 12)
  • Freedom Walk of America™ (Optional Lesson 13)


Depending on the learner, instructors may choose to front load or teach the vocabulary in context as outlined in the lessons below.

Scope and Sequence

The scope and sequence below should be used based on student cognitive levels. It may be appropriate to instruct using a combination primary/middle or middle/high to scaffold when teaching students at varying levels.

 Lesson TopicPrimaryMiddleHigh
Lesson #1Red Bull MemorialParticipants will be able to express their appreciation to the service men and women who protect their rights.Participants will explain the symbolism of the Red Bull Infantry Division Insignia.Participants will make connections between wars and the rights that were protected by the Red Bull Infantry Division.
Lesson #2Introduction to Bill of RightsParticipants will create rights for their own country which will then be connected back to the need for the Bill of RightsParticipants will create rights for their own country through collaboration, making the task more complex. Participants will also learn how to remember the rights included in each amendment using their hands.Participants will learn about historical context of the Bill of Rights focusing on Federalist and Antifederalist points of view.
Lesson #31st AmendmentParticipants will develop a basic understanding of the 1st amendment rights by learning about them, then coming up with their own concrete real life examples. Participants will also learn how to remember the rights using hand gestures.Participants will learn about and evaluate the 1st amendment rights. Participants will begin with scenario based pre-test to evaluate their understanding of the 1st amendment with explanations as needed. Participants will then explore a landmark case: Tinker v. Des Moines to get an understanding of how this right has been challenged.Participants will explore topics in the news which relate to the first amendment and evaluate whether or not they violate first amendment rights using the Socratic seminar format. Examples include: Should a cross be included in the September 11th memorial? Obscene rants directed at cops: Is that freedom of speech?
Lesson #42nd AmendmentParticipants will learn about their 2nd amendment right by decoding complex vocabulary words (militia, keep and bear arms, infringe). Participants will also come up with scenarios as to why this right is important. Participants will learn about the 2nd amendment and discuss limitations to this right. For example: Who should not be able to own a gun? Should certain types of guns be illegal? The Socratic seminar format will be used.Participants will conduct a web-quest which will explore gun violence in the United States, gun control laws, and positions from gun advocates. Using this information, participants will be asked to write their own position statement using data and research to support their position.
Lesson #53rd AmendmentParticipants will learn about the 3rd amendment by visually decoding complex phrases (1-no soldier, 2-in time of peace, 3-shall be quartered, 4-without consent of the owner, 5-nor in time of war) visually and putting them all together to form an understanding. Participants will also gain a historical perspective as to why this right was included in the Bill of Rights. Participants will learn about the 3rd amendment by breaking down phrases and gaining a historical perspective as to why this right was included in the Bill of Rights. Participants will be asked to create a scenario in which this amendment may become relevant again. Participants will learn about the 3rd amendment by breaking down phrases to gain an understanding. Participants will also gain a historical perspective as to why this right was included in the Bill of Rights. Participants will be asked to create a scenario in which this amendment may become relevant again.
Lesson #64th AmendmentParticipants will learn about the 4th amendment rights using hand gestures. Participants will then develop a basic understanding of the 4th amendment rights by visually decoding complex phrases (1-secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects 2-against unreasonable searches and seizures 3-no warrants shall issue but upon probable cause). Participants will also understand the 4th, 5th, and 6th amendments using the Goldie Locks Trial (fictional). Participants will learn about the 4th amendment rights. Participants will then learn about how the 4th amendment applies to public school using real world examples: TLO v. New Jersey (1985) and Board of Education of Pottawatomie County v. Earls (2002). Participants will learn about the 4th amendment rights. Participants will evaluate how technology has impacted the fourth amendment using real world examples: Katz v. United States (1967)
United States v. Jones (2005)
Lesson #75th AmendmentParticipants will learn about the 5th amendment rights using hand gestures. Participants will then develop a basic understanding of the 5th amendment rights by visually decoding complex phrases (Americans can’t 1-witness against themselves, 2-be tried for the same crime twice, 3-be deprived of life, liberty or property without a proper trial). Participants will also understand the 4th, 5th, and 6th amendments using the Goldie Locks Trial (fictional). Participants will learn about the 5th amendment rights by decoding the amendment. Participants will explore Miranda v. Arizona and JDB v. North Carolina then transfer that knowledge to various scenarios. Participants will learn about the 5th amendment rights by decoding the amendment. Participants will learn about the connection between the 5th amendment and J.D.B. v. North Carolina.
Lesson #86th AmendmentParticipants will learn about the 6th amendment rights using hand gestures. Participants will then develop a basic understanding of the 6th amendment rights by visually decoding complex phrases (1-fair trial, 2-impartial jury, 3- questioning witnesses, 4-access to an attorney). Participants will also understand the 4th, 5th, and 6th amendments using the Goldie Locks Trial (fictional). Participants will learn about the 6th amendment rights by decoding the amendment. Participants will come up with their own hand gestures to help remember all of the rights included in the 6th amendment.Participants will learn about the 6th amendment rights by decoding the amendment. Participants will explore a criminal case of their choosing and explain how the defendants’ rights were upheld. Famous cases may be suggested as examples: The People v. O.J. Simpson, The State of Florida v. Casey Anthony, The State of Florida v. George Zimmerman.
Lesson #97th AmendmentParticipants will learn about what a jury is and the difference between civil and criminal cases. Participants will be provided with various scenarios and will have to determine if the case is a criminal or civil case. Participants will reference the fictional Goldie Locks Trial to determine if it was civil or criminal. Participants will learn about what a jury is and the difference between civil and criminal cases. Participants will be asked to provided real-world examples criminal and civil cases. Participants will also have to situations that have led to both a criminal and civil case involving the same defendant.Participants will learn about what a jury is and the difference between civil and criminal cases. Participants will be asked to provided real-world examples criminal and civil cases. Participants will also have to criteria that would be used to determine a fair jury using a specific case of their choosing as the example.
Lesson #108th AmendmentParticipants will learn about the 8th amendment rights using hand gestures. Participants will then develop a basic understanding of the 8th amendment rights by visually decoding complex phrases (cruel and unusual punishment and excessive bail). Participants will reference the fictional Goldie Locks Trial and rewrite a portion of the case to provide an example of excessive bail and cruel and unusual punishment. Participants will then develop a basic understanding of the 8th amendment rights by visually decoding complex phrases (cruel and unusual punishment and excessive bail). Participants will then research and debate whether or not capital punishment is a form or cruel and unusual punishment during a Socratic Seminar.Participants will then develop a basic understanding of the 8th amendment rights by visually decoding complex phrases (cruel and unusual punishment and excessive bail). Participants will read the article Rasta Inmates Spend Decade in Isolation for Dreadlock Hair. Participants will then evaluate whether or not this is cruel and unusual punishment and how this situation is influenced by the 1st amendment.
Lesson #119th AmendmentParticipants will then develop a basic understanding of the 9th amendment rights by decoding complex phrases (1-enumeration of the Constitution, 2-shall not be construed to deny or disparage others). Why did the founding fathers include the 9th amendment?Participants will then develop a basic understanding of the 9th amendment rights by decoding complex phrases (1-enumeration of the Constitution, 2-shall not be construed to deny or disparage others). Participants will explain why did the founding fathers included the 9th amendment. Participants will then develop a basic understanding of the 9th amendment rights and explain why did the founding fathers included the 9th amendment. Participants will explore how Roe v. Wade is connected to the 9th amendment.
Lesson #1210th AmendmentParticipants will a basic understanding of the 10th amendment by decoding complex phrases (1-powers not delegated to the US by the Constitution, 2-nor prohibited by the states, 3-are reserved to the states or people). Participants will be provided with examples and asked to determine who owns rights related to issues.Participants will a basic understanding of the 10th amendment by decoding complex phrases (1-powers not delegated to the US by the Constitution, 2-nor prohibited by the states, 3-are reserved to the states or people). Participants will be provided with examples (right to die, medicinal marijuana, education, and immigration) and asked to determine who owns rights related to issues supporting their answers with evidence.Participants will a basic understanding of the 10th amendment by decoding complex phrases (1-powers not delegated to the US by the Constitution, 2-nor prohibited by the states, 3-are reserved to the states or people). Participants will be provided with examples (right to die, medicinal marijuana, education, and immigration) and asked to determine who owns rights related to issues supporting their answers with evidence.
Lesson #13Freedom Walk of America (OPTIONAL)
The Freedom Walk of America is a memorial to the Bill of Rights and the Rosemount-based 34th Red Bull Infantry. Prior to visiting the memorial, participants will learn about the Bill of Rights. This will provide a deeper level of understanding and appreciation for the memorial.

Prior to arriving, brainstorm what might be included in the memorial (symbolic references, types of material used, what may be emphasized with each amendment).

After visiting the memorial, reflect on what specific parts of the memorial were the most significant. What feelings were present and why?